C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Aircraft profile

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The C-9 fleet is located throughout the continental United States, Europe, and Asia. The Navy and Marine Corps C-9 aircraft provide cargo and passenger transportation as well as forward deployment logistics support.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightangle from the 30th Airlift Squadron, takes off for the final time after a farewell ceremony here.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightangle from the 30th Airlift Squadron, takes off for the final time after a farewell ceremony here.

The Air Force C-9s are used for medical evacuation, passenger transportation, and special missions.

Features

The C-9 is the military version of the McDonnell Douglas DC-9 used for many years by commercial airlines.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

Service

Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force

General Characteristics

Primary Function: C-9A/C aeromedical evacuation, C-9B cargo transport.

Contractor: Boeing Aircraft Corporation (formerly the McDonnell Douglas Corporation).
Date Deployed: August 1968.
Unit Cost: $35 million.
Propulsion: Two Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9A turbofan engines.
Length: 119 feet 3 inches (35.7 meters).
Height: 27 feet 5 inches (8.2 meters).
Wingspan: 93 feet 3 inches (27.9 meters).

Weight: Basic weight is 65,283 pounds (29,369 kg) in passenger configuration; 59,706 pounds (26,868 kg) in cargo configuration; Maximum takeoff weight is 108,000 pounds (48,600 kg).

Airspeed: 565 mph (Mach 0.86/904 km/h) at 25,000 feet ( 7.500 meters), with maximum takeoff weight.

Ceiling: 37,000 feet.

Range: More than 2,000 miles (1,739 nautical miles or 3,200 km).

Crew: C-9A/C, eight (pilot, copilot, flight mechanic, two flight nurses, three aeromedical technicians); C-9B, two pilots plus cabin attendants.

Load: 40 litter patients or four litters and 40 ambulatory patients or other combinations.

Source: US Navy

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Pensacola, Fla. (Sept. 9, 2005) – U.S. Navy Cmdr. James McSweeney, and Cmdr. Robert Velez, pilot a C-9 Skytrain cargo plane from the Hurricane Katrina staging area at Sherman Field aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola loaded with 25,000 pounds of Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) for the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. The Navy's involvement in the Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations are led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Gary NicholsC-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Pensacola, Fla. (Sept. 9, 2005) – U.S. Navy Cmdr. James McSweeney, and Cmdr. Robert Velez, pilot a C-9 Skytrain cargo plane from the Hurricane Katrina staging area at Sherman Field aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola loaded with 25,000 pounds of Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) for the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. The Navy's involvement in the Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations are led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Gary Nichols

Detailed background:

Source: wikipedia.org

The McDonnell Douglas C-9 is a military version of the DC-9. It was produced as the C-9A Nightingale for the United States Air Force, and the C-9B Skytrain II for the U.S. Naval Reserve and Marine Corps. The final active-duty flight of the C-9A Nightingale was in September 2005. The Boeing C-40 Clipper is replacing the Navy Reserve's aging C-9B fleet.

Design and development

The US Air Force C-9A Nightingale aircraft were used for medical evacuation (MedEvac), passenger transportation, and special missions from 1968-2005.

The C-9B aircraft provided cargo and passenger transportation as well as forward deployed air logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps. A C-9B was chosen by NASA for reduced gravity research, replacing the aging KC-135 Vomit Comet.

Many of the Navy's C-9Bs have a higher maximum gross take-off weight (114,000 lb or 52,000 kg) and are fitted with auxiliary fuel tanks installed in the lower cargo hold to augment the aircraft's range to nearly 2,600 nautical miles (4,200 km) for overseas missions along with tail mounted infra-red (IR) scramblers to counter heat seeking missile threats in hostile environments.

The C-9 fleet was located throughout the continental U.S., Europe, and Asia.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- The flight crew of the C-9B Skytrain II "City of San Diego," attached to the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57), maintain a close watch on the lead aircraft during a photo flight near San Diego. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- The flight crew of the C-9B Skytrain II "City of San Diego," attached to the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57), maintain a close watch on the lead aircraft during a photo flight near San Diego. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

Variants

* C-9A Nightingale - 23 aeromedical evacuation aircraft for the United States Air Force received from 1968.

* C-9B Skytrain II - 24 convertible passenger/transport versions for the United States Navy and Marine Corps delivered from 1973 to 1976. An additional five C-9s were converted from passenger configured DC-9s.

* VC-9C - 3 executive transport aircraft for the United States Air Force. Three aircraft (73-1681, 73-1682, 73-1683) were delivered to the US Air Force in late 1976.

* C-9K - 2 aircraft for the Kuwait Air Force.

Operators

Kuwait

* Kuwait Air Force

United States

* United States Air Force
* United States Marine Corps
* United States Navy
* NASA

More photos:

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes by the Coronado Bay Bridge during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes by the Coronado Bay Bridge during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Ft. Worth, TX, Dec. 18, 2001 --- The C-40A Clipper is replacing the C-9 Skytrain for the Navy Reserve and VR-59 is the first squadron to receive theirs. It's a new configuration by Boeing of their 737, a 737-700C (C for Convertible). The C-40A is faster, quieter, meets current international noise regulations, and has extended flight capability. U.S. Navy Photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Michael A. HarnarC-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, Ft. Worth, TX, Dec. 18, 2001 --- The C-40A Clipper is replacing the C-9 Skytrain for the Navy Reserve and VR-59 is the first squadron to receive theirs. It's a new configuration by Boeing of their 737, a 737-700C (C for Convertible). The C-40A is faster, quieter, meets current international noise regulations, and has extended flight capability. U.S. Navy Photo by Chief Photographer's Mate Michael A. Harnar

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: A C-9C aircraft stands ready in the early morning fog before taking off on a special air mission. The 932nd Airlift Wing, an Air Force Reserve Command unit in Illinois, flies the C-9C and the C-40C at Scott Air Force Base. (U. S. Air Force photo by Maj. Stan Paregien)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: A C-9C aircraft stands ready in the early morning fog before taking off on a special air mission. The 932nd Airlift Wing, an Air Force Reserve Command unit in Illinois, flies the C-9C and the C-40C at Scott Air Force Base. (U. S. Air Force photo by Maj. Stan Paregien)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Airmen in the Air Force Reserve Command's 932nd Airlift Wing received the first new C-40C transport (right) during a special ceremony Feb. 26 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. The plane on the left is a C-9C, also flown by 932nd aircrews. Both planes are used for the distinguished visitor mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Mr. Marv Lynchard)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Airmen in the Air Force Reserve Command's 932nd Airlift Wing received the first new C-40C transport (right) during a special ceremony Feb. 26 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill. The plane on the left is a C-9C, also flown by 932nd aircrews. Both planes are used for the distinguished visitor mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Mr. Marv Lynchard)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale became part of the Air Force inventory August 1968. (U.S. Air Force photo)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale became part of the Air Force inventory August 1968. (U.S. Air Force photo)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flew special aeromedical evacuation missions. The aircraft deployed August 1968 and its medical mission was retired August 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flew special aeromedical evacuation missions. The aircraft deployed August 1968 and its medical mission was retired August 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale top: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flies a mission August 1968. (U.S. Air Force photo)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale top: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flies a mission August 1968. (U.S. Air Force photo)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flew special aeromedical evacuation missions. The aircraft deployed August 1968 and its medical mission was retired August 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: 1960s -- The C-9 Nightingale flew special aeromedical evacuation missions. The aircraft deployed August 1968 and its medical mission was retired August 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightangle from the 30th Airlift Squadron, takes off for the final time after a farewell ceremony here. The C-9, which has served as the premier medical evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo Master Sgt. Val Gempis)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightangle from the 30th Airlift Squadron, takes off for the final time after a farewell ceremony here. The C-9, which has served as the premier medical evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July 2003. (U.S. Air Force photo Master Sgt. Val Gempis)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- First Lt. Allen Specht boards his C-9 Nightingale for the final time Sept. 14. Specht is assigned to the 30th Airlift Squadron here. The Nightingale, which served as the premier medical-evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July and taken to the "boneyard" at Davis- Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. In 2002, the 30th AS accumulated more than 3,200 flying hours during 1,280 sorties, while airlifting more than 10,300 patients and passengers in the Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Val Gempis)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- First Lt. Allen Specht boards his C-9 Nightingale for the final time Sept. 14. Specht is assigned to the 30th Airlift Squadron here. The Nightingale, which served as the premier medical-evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July and taken to the "boneyard" at Davis- Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. In 2002, the 30th AS accumulated more than 3,200 flying hours during 1,280 sorties, while airlifting more than 10,300 patients and passengers in the Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Val Gempis)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightingale from the 30th Airlift Squadron here took off for the final time Sept. 14 on its way to the "boneyard" at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. The Nightingale, which served as the premier medical-evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July. The 30th AS will deactivate Sept. 25. In 2002, the 30th AS accumulated more than 3,200 flying hours during 1,280 sorties, while airlifting more than 10,300 patients and passengers in the Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Val Gempis)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan -- A C-9 Nightingale from the 30th Airlift Squadron here took off for the final time Sept. 14 on its way to the "boneyard" at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. The Nightingale, which served as the premier medical-evacuation aircraft for the Air Force for 35 years, was retired in July. The 30th AS will deactivate Sept. 25. In 2002, the 30th AS accumulated more than 3,200 flying hours during 1,280 sorties, while airlifting more than 10,300 patients and passengers in the Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Val Gempis)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: The C-9 is a twin-engine, T-tailed, medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft used primarily for Air Mobility Command's aeromedical evacuation mission. The Nightingale is a modified version of the McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Corporation's DC-9. It is the only aircraft in the inventory specifically designed for the movement of litter and ambulatory patients. The C-9A's airlift capability to carry 40 litter patients, 40 ambulatory and four litter patients, or various combinations thereof, provides the flexibility for Air Mobility Command's worldwide aeromedical evacuation role. A hydraulically operated folding ramp allows efficient loading and unloading of litter patients and special medical equipment. (U.S. Air Force Photo)C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: The C-9 is a twin-engine, T-tailed, medium-range, swept-wing jet aircraft used primarily for Air Mobility Command's aeromedical evacuation mission. The Nightingale is a modified version of the McDonnell Douglas Aircraft Corporation's DC-9. It is the only aircraft in the inventory specifically designed for the movement of litter and ambulatory patients. The C-9A's airlift capability to carry 40 litter patients, 40 ambulatory and four litter patients, or various combinations thereof, provides the flexibility for Air Mobility Command's worldwide aeromedical evacuation role. A hydraulically operated folding ramp allows efficient loading and unloading of litter patients and special medical equipment. (U.S. Air Force Photo)

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) passes Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- With the San Diego skyline in the background, a C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- With the San Diego skyline in the background, a C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over Coronado, California during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) climbs above the clouds during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) climbs above the clouds during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over the Pacific Ocean during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over the Pacific Ocean during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over its homebase of NAS North Island during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- A C-9B Skytrain II from the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57) flies over its homebase of NAS North Island during a routine training flight. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Pensacola, Fla. (Sept. 9, 2005) – U.S. Navy Cmdr. James McSweeney, and Cmdr. Robert Velez, pilot a C-9 Skytrain cargo plane from the Hurricane Katrina staging area at Sherman Field aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola loaded with 25,000 pounds of Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) for the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. The Navy's involvement in the Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations are led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Gary NicholsC-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Pensacola, Fla. (Sept. 9, 2005) – U.S. Navy Cmdr. James McSweeney, and Cmdr. Robert Velez, pilot a C-9 Skytrain cargo plane from the Hurricane Katrina staging area at Sherman Field aboard Naval Air Station Pensacola loaded with 25,000 pounds of Meals Ready to Eat (MREs) for the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. The Navy's involvement in the Hurricane Katrina humanitarian assistance operations are led by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), in conjunction with the Department of Defense. U.S. Navy photo by Gary Nichols

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Norfolk, Va. (Aug. 1, 2004) - A C-9B Skytrain II assigned to the "Globemasters" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Five Six (VR-56) approaches the runway aboard Naval Station Norfolk, Va. VR-56 provides around-the-world logistical support to all branches of our Armed Forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLainC-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: Norfolk, Va. (Aug. 1, 2004) - A C-9B Skytrain II assigned to the "Globemasters" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Five Six (VR-56) approaches the runway aboard Naval Station Norfolk, Va. VR-56 provides around-the-world logistical support to all branches of our Armed Forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain

C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- The flight crew of the C-9B Skytrain II "City of San Diego," attached to the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57), maintain a close watch on the lead aircraft during a photo flight near San Diego. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.C-9 Skytrain / Nightingale: San Diego, Calif. (August 19, 2003) -- The flight crew of the C-9B Skytrain II "City of San Diego," attached to the "Conquistadors" of Fleet Logistics Squadron Fifty Seven (VR-57), maintain a close watch on the lead aircraft during a photo flight near San Diego. VR-57 is a Naval Reserve squadron comprised of active duty and selected reserve personnel that provide around-the-clock, world-wide logistics support for the Navy and Marine Corps regular and reserve forces. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Edward G. Martens.

More photos: C-9 Nightingale / Skytrain photo gallery

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