Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: Aircraft profile

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The Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star is an American-built jet trainer aircraft.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft over Hawaii participating in Exercise Cope Canine '85.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft over Hawaii participating in Exercise Cope Canine '85.

The two-place T-33 jet was designed for training pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft. It was developed from the single-seat P-80) aircraft profile">F-80 fighter by lengthening the fuselage about three feet to accommodate a second cockpit.

Originally designated the TF-80C, the T-33 made its first flight in 1948. Production continued until 1959 with 5,691 T-33s built. In addition to its use as a trainer, the T-33 has been used for such tasks as drone director and target towing, and in some countries even as a combat aircraft. The RT-33A, a reconnaissance version made primarily for use by foreign countries, had a camera installed in the nose and additional equipment in the rear cockpit.

The T-33 is one of the world's best-known aircraft, having served with the air forces of more than 20 different nations over several decades. The T-33A on display was flown to the museum in 1962.

Technical notes:

Armament: Two .50-cal. machine guns in nose

Maximum speed: 525 mph

Cruising speed: 455 mph

Range: 1,000 miles

Ceiling: 45,000 ft.

Span: 37 ft. 6 in.

Length: 37 ft. 8 in.

Height: 11 ft. 7 in.

Weight: 15,000 lbs. maximum

Serial number: 53-5974

Source: US Air Force

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) banks into a right turn over the Florida coast on a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) banks into a right turn over the Florida coast on a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.

Detailed background:

Source: wikipedia.org

The Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star is an American-built jet trainer aircraft. It was produced by Lockheed and made its first flight in 1948, piloted by Tony LeVier. The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 starting as TP-80C/TF-80C in development, then designated T-33A. It was used by the U.S. Navy initially as TO-2 then TV-2, and after 1962, T-33B. Despite its vintage, the venerable T-33 still remains in service worldwide.

Design and development

The T-33 was developed from the Lockheed P-80/F-80 by lengthening the fuselage by slightly over three feet and adding a second seat, instrumentation and flight controls. It was initially designated as a variant of the P-80/F-80, the TP-80C/TF-80C.

Design work for the Lockheed P-80 began in 1943 with the first flight on 8 January 1944. Following on the Bell P-59, the P-80 became the first jet fighter to enter full squadron service in the United States Army Air Forces. As more advanced jets entered service, the F-80 took on another role - training jet pilots. The two-place T-33 jet was designed for training pilots already qualified to fly propeller-driven aircraft.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Originally designated the TF-80C, the T-33 made its first flight on 22 March 1948 with US production taking place from 1948 to 1959. The US Navy used the T-33 as a land-based trainer starting in 1949. It was designated the TV-2, but was redesignated the T-33B in 1962. The Navy operated some ex-USAF P-80Cs as the TO-1, changed to the TV-1 about a year later. A carrier-capable version of the P-80/T-33 family was subsequently developed by Lockheed, eventually leading to the late 1950s to 1970s T2V-1/T-1A SeaStar. A total of 6,557 Shooting Stars were produced, 5,691 by Lockheed.

Operational service

The two-place T-33 proved to be a suitable advanced trainer, and it has been used for such tasks as drone director and target towing, and some T-33s retained two machine guns for gunnery training. In some countries, the T-33 was even employed as a combat aircraft. The RT-33A version, reconnaissance aircraft produced primarily for use by foreign countries, had a camera installed in the nose and additional equipment in the rear cockpit. T-33s continued to fly as currency trainers, drone towing, combat and tactical simulation training, "hack" aircraft, electronic countermeasures and warfare training and test platforms right into the 1980s.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed NT-33A cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed NT-33A cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)

The T-33 has served with over 30 nations, and continues to operate as a trainer in smaller air forces. Canadair built 656 T-33s on licence for service in the Canadian Forces as the CT-133 Silver Star while Kawasaki manufactured 210 in Japan. Other operators included Brazil, Turkey and Thailand which used the T-33 extensively.

In the 1980s, an attempt was made to modify and modernize the T-33 as the Boeing Skyfox, but a lack of orders led to the cancellation of the project. About 70% of the T-33s airframe was retained in the Skyfox, but it was powered by two Garrett TFE731-3A turbofan engines.

A limited number of T-33s have found their way into private hands; Michael Dorn of Star Trek: The Next Generation fame also owns a Canadair T-33. On 6 September 2006, Imperial War Museum Duxford's Canadair T-33 (G-TBRD), owned by the Golden Apple Trust, was destroyed in a takeoff accident; the crew survived. G-TBRD was the first jet warbird to be operated from Duxford, arriving in 1975 and originally registered as G-OAHB.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron, the last active T-33 squadron, bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron, the last active T-33 squadron, bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.

Variants

USAF

* T-33A: Two-seat jet trainer aircraft.

* AT-33A: Two-seat attack version of the T-33A.

* DT-33A: This designation was given to a number of T-33As converted into drone directors.

* NT-33A: This designation was given to a number of T-33As converted into special test aircraft.

* QT-33A: This designation was given to number of T-33As converted into target drones.

* RT-33A: Two-seat reconnaissance version of the AT-33A.

US Navy

* TO-1/TV-1: U.S. Navy designation of P-80C, 50 transferred to USN in 1949 as jet trainers (not technically T-33 Shooting Star)

* TO-2: Two-seat land-based jet training aircraft for the US Navy. It was the US Navy's version of the T-33A. Later redesignated TV-2.

* TV-2KD: This designation was given to number of TV-2s converted into drone directors.

* T-33B redesignation of Navy's TV-2 in 1962.

* DT-33B redesignation of Navy's TV-2KD.

Canada

* CT-133 Silver Star : Two-seat jet trainer for the RCAF/ Canadian Forces (also communications, target towing and electronic warfare duties).

Survivors

Numerous T-33s have been preserved as museum and commemorative displays including:

* T-33A-1-LO ,580-8189 is in the Yugoslav Aeronautical Museum in Belgrade , Serbia.

* T-33A-1-LO, 51-4419 and 17473: On loan from the USAF Museum at the Midland Air Museum, Coventry, England.

* T-33A-1-LO, 51-4301 is on static display at Vance AFB, OK.

* T-33A-1-LO, 58-0629 is on display at Castle Air Museum, Atwater, CA

* The town of Othello, Washington in the United States has a decommissioned T-33 on display in a park near the City Hall.

* T-33A-1-LO, 58-0616 is on display at McChord Air Museum, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.

* T-33A-1-LO, 51-2129? is in display at the Collings Foundation in Stow, MA.

* T-33A-1-LO, 52-9958 Yugoslav 10024 (serial number: 580-8189) is on display at Yugoslav Aeronautical Museum, Nikola Tesla Airport, Belgrade, Serbia.

* T-33A-5-LO, 53-5226N is on display at the National Air and Space Museum's Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center

* T-33A, 52-9497 is on display at the Air Mobility Command Museum, Dover AFB, DE

* 4 unknown T-33, on static display in Uruguay. Uruguayan Air Force Airbase #2 (St. Bernardina, Durazno), Airbase #1 (Carrasco Intl. Airport), ETA (Technical Air School), Museo Aeronáutico (Air Museum)

* Unknown T-33, is under restoration to flying condition with the Collings Foundation out of their Houston, Texas facility

* Unknown T-33, on static display in the Deutsches Museum Flugwerft Scheißheim near Munich. It carries the markings of the German Luftwaffe

* Unknown T-33, on display in the Royal Thai Air Force museum.

Specifications (T-33A)

General characteristics

* Crew: Two

* Length: 37 ft 9 in (11.2 m)

* Wingspan: 38 ft 10.5 in (11.5 m)

* Height: 11 ft 8 in (3.3 m)

* Empty weight: 8,300 lb (3,775 kg)

* Max takeoff weight: 15,100 lb (6,865 kg)

* Powerplant: 1× Allison J33-A-35 centrifugal compressor turbojet, 5,400 lbf (23 kN)

Performance

* Maximum speed: 600 mph (970 km/h)

* Range: 1,275 miles ferry (2,050 km)

* Service ceiling 48,000 ft (14,600 m)

Armament

* (AT-33) 2x 0.50 in (12.7 mm) Browning M3 machine guns with 350 rounds per gun

* Up to 2,000 lb (907 kg) of ordnance on two underwing hardpoints. Weapons carried include bombs and rocket pods.

More photos:

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air left side view of an F-15 Eagle aircraft, left, an F-106 Delta Dart aircraft, top, and a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, bottom, in formation near a snow-covered mountain top. The aircraft are assigned to the 318th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air left side view of an F-15 Eagle aircraft, left, an F-106 Delta Dart aircraft, top, and a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, bottom, in formation near a snow-covered mountain top. The aircraft are assigned to the 318th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: Crewmen prepare to upload a photo pod onto a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft during Exercise Brim Frost '83.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: Crewmen prepare to upload a photo pod onto a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft during Exercise Brim Frost '83.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An experimental photo pod installed on the left wing of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft Exercise Brim Frost '83.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An experimental photo pod installed on the left wing of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft Exercise Brim Frost '83.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft and two Royal Australian Air Force CA-29 Mirage aircraft during the Cope Thunder exercise.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft and two Royal Australian Air Force CA-29 Mirage aircraft during the Cope Thunder exercise.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 15th Air Base Wing in an echelon formation over Diamondhead.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 15th Air Base Wing in an echelon formation over Diamondhead.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter of the 205th Aviation Company delivers a French T-33 Shooting Star aircraft to be used as a battle-damaged aircraft for quick turn-around maintenance training. The Spanish government would not permit the delivery of the aircraft to any other base in Spain.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An Army CH-47 Chinook helicopter of the 205th Aviation Company delivers a French T-33 Shooting Star aircraft to be used as a battle-damaged aircraft for quick turn-around maintenance training. The Spanish government would not permit the delivery of the aircraft to any other base in Spain.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A view of a Philippines Air Force F-5E Tiger II aircraft, left front, a USAF T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, left rear, a USAF F-5E Tiger II aircraft, right front, and a USAF F-4 Phantom II aircraft parked on the flight line during Exercise COPE THUNDER '84.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A view of a Philippines Air Force F-5E Tiger II aircraft, left front, a USAF T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, left rear, a USAF F-5E Tiger II aircraft, right front, and a USAF F-4 Phantom II aircraft parked on the flight line during Exercise COPE THUNDER '84.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right underside view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, top, an F-106 Delta Dart aircraft, center, and an F-15 Eagle aircraft, bottom, in formation. The aircraft are assigned to the 318th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right underside view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft, top, an F-106 Delta Dart aircraft, center, and an F-15 Eagle aircraft, bottom, in formation. The aircraft are assigned to the 318th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, McChord Air Force Base, Washington.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York as they bank to the left.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York as they bank to the left.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right rear view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 5021st Tactical Operations Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base. January 84 Airman Magazine.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right rear view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 5021st Tactical Operations Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base. January 84 Airman Magazine.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air underside view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air underside view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of four T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 49th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft takes off during the air-to-air weapons meet WILLIAM TELL '86. The T-33s are being used as profile area safety monitors and drones during the air-to-air weapons meet.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft takes off during the air-to-air weapons meet WILLIAM TELL '86. The T-33s are being used as profile area safety monitors and drones during the air-to-air weapons meet.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right rear view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 5021st Tactical Operations Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base. January 84 Airman Magazine.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right rear view of a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft assigned to the 5021st Tactical Operations Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base. January 84 Airman Magazine.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) banks into a right turn over the Florida coast on a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) banks into a right turn over the Florida coast on a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A left side view of two T-33 Shooting Star aircraft in flight. The further aircraft has been repainted and renumbered in anticipation of its delivery to the Mexican air force, to which it has been sold. The closer T-33 still belongs to the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, the last active T-33 squadron in the Air Force. At the end of Fiscal Year 1988, the T-33 will be phased out, ending nearly 40 years of service for the aircraft.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A left side view of two T-33 Shooting Star aircraft in flight. The further aircraft has been repainted and renumbered in anticipation of its delivery to the Mexican air force, to which it has been sold. The closer T-33 still belongs to the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, the last active T-33 squadron in the Air Force. At the end of Fiscal Year 1988, the T-33 will be phased out, ending nearly 40 years of service for the aircraft.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron, the last active T-33 squadron, bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft of the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron, the last active T-33 squadron, bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: On a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) flies westward, its wings highlighted and fuselage silhouetted by the rays of the setting sun. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: On a flight from its home at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, a T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron (95th FITS) flies westward, its wings highlighted and fuselage silhouetted by the rays of the setting sun. The 95th FITS, which is the last active T-33 squadron, will phase out the aircraft at the end of Fiscal Year 1988.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft over Hawaii participating in Exercise Cope Canine '85.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: An air-to-air right side view of A T-33 Shooting Star aircraft over Hawaii participating in Exercise Cope Canine '85.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A view of some of the U.S. Navy and Air Force T-33 Shooting Star aircraft lined up at the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center. More than 2,500 aircraft from all services are stored at the center, only a small percentage of which are scrapped. Most of the aircraft are used for parts, returned to service, sold to foreign governments or donated to federal and state agencies.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A view of some of the U.S. Navy and Air Force T-33 Shooting Star aircraft lined up at the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center. More than 2,500 aircraft from all services are stored at the center, only a small percentage of which are scrapped. Most of the aircraft are used for parts, returned to service, sold to foreign governments or donated to federal and state agencies.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A Canadian Forces' T-33 Silver Star, fighter trainer, assigned to the 417th Combat Operation Squadron returns for a landing at 4 Wing Cold Lake. The T-33 is participating as a target in the exercise that will test the response of the air intercept and air defense capabilities of the American and Canadian Forces, supporting the mission of NORAD (North American Air Defense command).Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A Canadian Forces' T-33 Silver Star, fighter trainer, assigned to the 417th Combat Operation Squadron returns for a landing at 4 Wing Cold Lake. The T-33 is participating as a target in the exercise that will test the response of the air intercept and air defense capabilities of the American and Canadian Forces, supporting the mission of NORAD (North American Air Defense command).

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed NT-33A cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: DAYTON, Ohio -- Lockheed NT-33A cockpit at the National Museum of the United States Air Force. (Photo courtesy of John Rossino, Lockheed Martin Code One)

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. The 95th FITS, which was the last active T-33 squadron, phased out the aircraft at the end of 1988.Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star: A pair of T-33 Shooting Star aircraft from the 95th Fighter Interceptor Training Squadron bank left off the wing of a third T-33 on a flight out of Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla. The 95th FITS, which was the last active T-33 squadron, phased out the aircraft at the end of 1988.

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star flight: The Red Knight a T-33 "Sliver Star" Pace Plane, flown by Chris Rounds with the Sunrise Mountain area of Las Vegas in the background. The Red Knight marks the path for the Unlimited Air Racers at Aviation Nation 2003 held at Nellis Air Force Base (AFB), Nevada (NV).Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star flight: The Red Knight a T-33 "Sliver Star" Pace Plane, flown by Chris Rounds with the Sunrise Mountain area of Las Vegas in the background. The Red Knight marks the path for the Unlimited Air Racers at Aviation Nation 2003 held at Nellis Air Force Base (AFB), Nevada (NV).

More photos: Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star photo gallery

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