T-2 Buckeye: Aircraft profile

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The T-2C Buckeye is a tandem-seat, carrier-capable, all-purpose jet trainer whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots and Naval Flight Officers.

T-2 Buckeye: Patuxent River, Md. (Aug. 3, 2005) - A T-2C Buckeye, assigned to the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, takes off for a training flight from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.T-2 Buckeye: Patuxent River, Md. (Aug. 3, 2005) - A T-2C Buckeye, assigned to the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School, takes off for a training flight from Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md.

Features

The T-2C is used for intermediate and advanced training for Navy and Marine Corps pilots and Naval Flight Officers in training for jet carrier aviation and tactical strike missions. Designed in the mid 1950s to use proven technologies wherever possible, it shares its wing with the FJ-1 Fury, one of the Navy's earliest jet fighters.

The tandem cockpit arrangement and slightly elevated rear cockpit gives the instructor good forward visibility over the student. Both cockpits are equipped with zero-level ejection seats. For armament training, the aircraft is equipped with underwing strong points to carry bombs, rockets or gun pods, as well as an arresting hook for carrier landings. Originally designed with a single engine, the T-2C variant, which entered fleet service in 1968, has two. Most T-2Cs have been replaced by the T-45 Goshawk. Some, however, remain in service around the fleet in various roles, as well as at the Naval Test Pilots School at NAS Patuxent River, Maryland.

T-2 Buckeye: Key West, Fla. (Mar. 3, 2004) – Ens. Myciel Scott, a student pilot assigned to the “Tigers” of Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), with Maj. Tim Harp (USMCR), an instructor with VT-9, demonstrate formation flying in a T-2C Buckeyes during a formation training mission over Key West, Fla. VT-9 came to Key West to teach Navy and Marine Corps student pilots formation flying and gunnery techniques. The instructors are part of Squadron Augment Unit Nine (SAU-9), the Reserve component for Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), one of two training squadrons that operate from Naval Air Station Meridian, Miss., under Training Wing One (TW-1). U.S. Navy photo by Ens. Darin K. Russell.T-2 Buckeye: Key West, Fla. (Mar. 3, 2004) – Ens. Myciel Scott, a student pilot assigned to the “Tigers” of Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), with Maj. Tim Harp (USMCR), an instructor with VT-9, demonstrate formation flying in a T-2C Buckeyes during a formation training mission over Key West, Fla. VT-9 came to Key West to teach Navy and Marine Corps student pilots formation flying and gunnery techniques. The instructors are part of Squadron Augment Unit Nine (SAU-9), the Reserve component for Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), one of two training squadrons that operate from Naval Air Station Meridian, Miss., under Training Wing One (TW-1). U.S. Navy photo by Ens. Darin K. Russell.

General Characteristics

Primary Function: All-purpose jet trainer.

Contractor: Rockwell International Corp.
Date Deployed: First flight, January 1958; Operational, July 1959; First flight of T-2C, April 1968.
Propulsion: Two General Electric 085-GE-4 turbojets (2,950 lbs thrust ea.).
Length: 38 feet 8 inches (11 meters).
Height: 14 feet 9 inches (4.7 meters).
Wingspan: 38 feet 2 inches (10.3 meters).
Weight: Take-off maximum gross, 13,180 pounds (5,931 kg); empty 8,115 pounds (3,652 kg).
Airspeed: 521 miles per hour (834 km per hour).
Ceiling: 44,400 feet.
Range: 910 miles (1,456 km).
Crew: Two (instructor pilot, student pilot).
Armament: Provision for gun pods, bombs or rockets under wings.

Source: US Navy

T-2 Buckeye: Key West, Fla. (Mar. 3, 2004) – Student pilots fly T-2C Buckeyes assigned to the “Tigers” of Training Squadron Nine in a tight formation during a training flight in Key West, Fla. VT-9 came to Key West to teach Navy and Marine Corps student pilots formation flying and gunnery techniques. The instructors are part of Squadron Augment Unit Nine (SAU-9), the Reserve component for Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), one of two training squadrons that operate from Naval Air Station Meridian, Miss., under Training Wing One (TW-1). U.S. Navy photo by Ens Darin K. Russell.T-2 Buckeye: Key West, Fla. (Mar. 3, 2004) – Student pilots fly T-2C Buckeyes assigned to the “Tigers” of Training Squadron Nine in a tight formation during a training flight in Key West, Fla. VT-9 came to Key West to teach Navy and Marine Corps student pilots formation flying and gunnery techniques. The instructors are part of Squadron Augment Unit Nine (SAU-9), the Reserve component for Training Squadron Nine (VT-9), one of two training squadrons that operate from Naval Air Station Meridian, Miss., under Training Wing One (TW-1). U.S. Navy photo by Ens Darin K. Russell.

Detailed background:

Source: wikipedia.org

The North American T-2 Buckeye was the United States Navy's intermediate training aircraft, intended to introduce Student Naval Aviators to jets. It entered service in 1959, and in 2008, was replaced by the T-45 Goshawk.

Design and development

The first version of the aircraft entered service in 1959 as the T2J-1. It was re-designated the T-2A in 1962 under the joint aircraft designation system. The two-seat trainer was powered by one Westinghouse J34-WE-46/48 turbojet engine. The aircraft was subsequently redesigned, and the single engine was replaced with two Pratt & Whitney J60-P-6 turbojets in the T-2B. The T-2C was fitted with two much more powerful 2,950 lbf (13,100 N) thrust General Electric J85-GE-4 turbojets. The T-2D was an export version which was sold to the Venezuelan air force, while the T-2E was sold to the Greek Air Force. The T-2 Buckeye (along with the TF-8J) replaced the T2V-1/T-1A Seastar, though the T-1 would continue in some uses into the 1970s.

The Buckeye was designed as a low-cost multi-stage trainer. Its straight wing is similar to that used in the original North American FJ-1 Fury. Its cockpit controls are similar to the T-28C trainer. The T-2's performance is between that of the Air Force's T-37 Tweet, and the TA-4J Skyhawk, which was used for advanced training, including carrier takeoffs and landings. While it has no built-in armament, the T-2 has two underwing hardpoints for .50 in gun pods, 100 lb (45 kg) practice bombs or 2.75 in rockets.

All T-2 Buckeyes were manufactured by North American at Air Force Plant 85, located just south of Port Columbus Airport in Columbus, Ohio. 273 aircraft were built during its production run. The name Buckeye refers to the state tree of Ohio, as well as the mascot of the Ohio State University.

Virtually every Naval aviator from the late 1950's until 2004 received training in the T-2 Buckeye, a career spanning four decades. In the Naval Aviator syllabus, the T-2 has been replaced by the near-sonic T-45 Goshawk (the US Navy version of the BAE Hawk), which is more comparable to other high performance subsonic trainers, or the USAF T-38 Talon. More recently, the T-2 has been used as a director aircraft for aerial drones. Several T-2 Buckeyes are now registered in civilian markings and regularly appear at airshows.

T-2 Buckeye touch-and-go: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul.16, 2003 -- A T-2C Buckeye assigned to Fixed Wing Training Squadron Nine (VT-9) performs a touch and go on the flight deck of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). This is the last time the T-2C Buckeye will be used to train student pilots aboard aircraft carriers. Truman is conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and an ammo off load, on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Danny Ewing Jr.T-2 Buckeye touch-and-go: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul.16, 2003 -- A T-2C Buckeye assigned to Fixed Wing Training Squadron Nine (VT-9) performs a touch and go on the flight deck of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). This is the last time the T-2C Buckeye will be used to train student pilots aboard aircraft carriers. Truman is conducting Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and an ammo off load, on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Danny Ewing Jr.

Variants

T-2A Buckeye

Two-seat imtermediate jet training aircraft, powered by a 1542-kg (3,400-lb) thrust Westinghouse J34-WE-36 turbojet engine. Original designation T2J-1 Buckeye. 217 built.

YT-2B Buckeye

Two T-2As were converted into T-2B prototype aircraft.

T-2B Buckeye

Improved version, powered by two 131-kg (3,000-lb) thrust Pratt & Whitney J60-P-1 turbojet engines. 97 built.

YT-2C Buckeye

One T-2B was converted into a T-2C prototype aircraft.

T-2C Buckeye

Final production version for the US Navy, powered by two 2,950-lbf (13,100N) thrust General Electric J85-GE-4 turbojet engine. 231 built.

DT-2B and DT-2C Buckeye

Small numbers of T-2Bs and T-2Cs were converted into drone directors.

T-2D Buckeye

Export version for Venezuela. 12 built.

T-2E Buckeye

Export version for Greece. 30 built.

Operators

Greece

* Hellenic Air Force

United States

* United States Navy

Venezuela

* Venezuelan Air Force

More photos: T-2C Buckeye photo gallery

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