T-45 Goshawk: Aircraft profile

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The T-45A Goshawk is a tandem-seat, carrier capable, jet trainer whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots.

T-45 Goshawk: The Pacific Ocean (Mar. 18, 2003) - A T-45 Goshawk lands on the flight deck aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).T-45 Goshawk: The Pacific Ocean (Mar. 18, 2003) - A T-45 Goshawk lands on the flight deck aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

Features

The T-45A aircraft, the Navy version of the British Aerospace Hawk aircraft, is used for intermediate and advanced portions of the Navy/Marine Corps pilot training program for jet carrier aviation and tactical strike missions. The T-45A has replaced the T-2 Buckeye trainer and the TA-4 trainer with an integrated training system that includes the T-45A Goshawk aircraft, operations and instrument fighter simulators, academics, and training integration system. There are two versions of T-45 aircraft currently in operational use at this time, the T-45A and T-45C derivatives. The T-45A, which became operational in 1991, contains an analog design cockpit while the new T-45C (began delivery in December 1997) is built around a new digital "glass cockpit" design.

T-45 Goshawk: South Texas (Oct. 18, 2003) -- A formation of T-45A Goshawks assigned to the “Golden Eagles” of Training Squadron Twenty Two (VS-22) from Naval Air Station (NAS) Kingsville fly en route to a flyover during a Texas A&M Kingsville football game. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Edward F. Ward III.T-45 Goshawk: South Texas (Oct. 18, 2003) -- A formation of T-45A Goshawks assigned to the “Golden Eagles” of Training Squadron Twenty Two (VS-22) from Naval Air Station (NAS) Kingsville fly en route to a flyover during a Texas A&M Kingsville football game. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Edward F. Ward III.

General Characteristics

Primary Function: Training platform for Navy/Marine Corps pilots.

Contractor: Boeing Company.
Date Deployed: First flight, April 1988; Operational, 1991.
Unit Cost: $17.2 million.
Propulsion: Rolls Royce F405-RR-401 turbofan engine with 5,527 pounds thrust.
Length: 39 feet 4 inches (11.98 meters).
Height: 13 feet 6 inches (4.11 meters).
Wingspan: 30 feet 10 inches (9.39 meters).
Weight: Take-off maximum gross, 13,500 pounds (6,075 kg); empty 9,394 pounds (4,261 kg).
Airspeed: 645 miles per hour (1038 km per hour).
Ceiling: 42,500 feet.
Range: 700 nautical miles (805 statute miles, 1288 km).
Crew: Two (instructor pilot, student pilot).
Armament: None.

Source: US Navy

T-45 Goshawk: Atlantic Ocean (Mar. 2, 2004) – A T-45C Goshawk assigned to Training Air Wing One launches from a waist catapult aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry. S. Truman (CVN 75) as another Goshawk awaits its launch from the ship’s bow. Harry S. Truman is currently undergoing carrier qualifications and flight deck certification off the Atlantic coast. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Ryan T. O'Connor.T-45 Goshawk: Atlantic Ocean (Mar. 2, 2004) – A T-45C Goshawk assigned to Training Air Wing One launches from a waist catapult aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry. S. Truman (CVN 75) as another Goshawk awaits its launch from the ship’s bow. Harry S. Truman is currently undergoing carrier qualifications and flight deck certification off the Atlantic coast. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Ryan T. O'Connor.

Detailed background:

Source: wikipedia.org

The T-45 Goshawk is a highly modified version of the BAE Hawk land-based training jet aircraft. Manufactured by McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) and British Aerospace (now BAE Systems), the T-45 is used by the United States Navy as an aircraft carrier-capable trainer.

T-45 Goshawk: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul. 16, 2003 - A T-45C Goshawk assigned to the “Eagles” of Training Squadron Seven (VT-7) prepares to be fueled on the flight deck aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is participating in an exercise with Fixed Wing Training Squadrons, training new pilots in carrier take-off and landing procedures on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Craig Spiering.T-45 Goshawk: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul. 16, 2003 - A T-45C Goshawk assigned to the “Eagles” of Training Squadron Seven (VT-7) prepares to be fueled on the flight deck aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is participating in an exercise with Fixed Wing Training Squadrons, training new pilots in carrier take-off and landing procedures on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Craig Spiering.

Design and development

The T-45 Goshawk is a fully carrier-capable version of the Hawk Mk.60. It was developed for the United States Navy (USN) for use in training.

The Goshawk's origins began in the mid-1970s, when the US Navy began looking for replacement for its T-2 and TA-4 trainers. The US Navy started the VTXTS advanced trainer program in 1978. British Aerospace and McDonnell Douglas proposed a version of the Hawk and were awarded the T-45 contract in 1981.

The Hawk had not been designed for carrier operations. Numerous modifications were required for Navy carrier use, including improvements to the low-speed handling characteristics and a reduction in the approach speed. Other changes were strengthened airframe, more robust and wider landing gear with catapult attachment and an arresting hook. It features a two-wheel nose landing gear.

The Goshawk first flew in 1988 and became operational in 1991. BAE Systems manufactures the fuselage aft of the cockpit, the air inlets, the vertical stabilizer of the T-45 at Samlesbury, and the wings at Brough, England. Boeing manufactures the remainder of the aircraft and assembles them in St. Louis, Missouri.

On 16 March 2007 the 200th airframe was delivered to the US Navy. Their requirements call for 223 aircraft, and the T-45 service is slated to continue until at least 2035. Operational history

The T-45 has been used for intermediate and advanced portions of the Navy/Marine Corps strike pilot training program with Training Air Wing ONE at Naval Air Station Meridian, Mississippi and Training Air Wing TWO at Naval Air Station Kingsville, Texas. The T-45 replaced the T-2C Buckeye trainer and the TA-4J Skyhawk II trainer with an integrated training system that includes the T-45 Goshawk aircraft, operational and instrument flight simulators (OFT/IFT), academics, and training integration system support. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2008, the T-45 will also commence use in the advanced portion of Navy/Marine Corps Naval Flight Officer (NFO) training with Training Air Wing SIX at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Florida.

The T-45's A and C models are currently in operational use. The T-45A, which became operational in 1991, contains an analog cockpit design while the newer T-45C, which was first delivered in December 1997, features a new digital "glass cockpit" design. All T-45A aircraft will eventually be converted to a T-45C configuration under the T-45 Required Avionics Modernization Program (T-45 RAMP).

T-45 Goshawk: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul.16, 2003 - A T-45C Goshawk assigned to the “Eagles” of Training Squadron Seven (VT-7) makes its final approach to the flight deck aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is participating in an exercise with Fixed Wing Training Squadrons, training new pilots in carrier take-off and landing procedures on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Ryan O'Connor.T-45 Goshawk: Aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Jul.16, 2003 - A T-45C Goshawk assigned to the “Eagles” of Training Squadron Seven (VT-7) makes its final approach to the flight deck aboard the nuclear powered aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Truman is participating in an exercise with Fixed Wing Training Squadrons, training new pilots in carrier take-off and landing procedures on the Eastern seaboard of the United States. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Ryan O'Connor.

Variants

T-45A

Two-seat basic and advanced jet trainer for the US Navy.

T-45B

Proposed land-based version for the US Navy, which would have been basically a conventional Hawk with a USN cockpit and no carrier capability. The USN had wanted the T-45B to get an earlier training capability, but abandoned the idea in 1984 in favor of less-costly updates to the TA-4 and T-2.

T-45C

Improved T-45A with glass cockpit, inertial navigation, and other improvements. Existing T-45As are being upgraded to the T-45C standard.

More photos: T-45 Goshawk photo gallery

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